lyncd

Use Let’s Encrypt to add an SSL certificate to your Dreamhost-hosted site

Update 2/2016: You don’t need to follow any of the instructions in this post any more! You can just enable a Let’s Encrypt certificate in the Dreamhost panel! But if you want to generate your own Let’s Encrypt certificate locally and add it to your site, keep reading, original post follows …

EFF’s Let’s Encrypt initiative just made getting a free, CA-signed server certificate easier than it’s ever been before. Running a single command generates everything you need, obtains the public cert and even installs it into your webserver of choice. So let’s encrypt, and move the web closer to HTTPS everywhere!

Here’s a quick tutorial for using Let’s Encrypt with Dreamhost’s shared hosting. It’s not quite automatic, since you’ll have to copy-paste 3 things into boxes via the Dreamhost web panel, but it’s a lot simpler than the alternatives. As someone who’s done this the old way countless times, Let’s Encrypt was shockingly easy! more …

Filed under: Code, Systems, Technology.  Tagged: , , , .

Add Brotli compression support to Apache for static assets and pages

The Apache web server doesn’t yet support stream compression using Brotli, but it’s easy to add support for static pages and assets such as CSS and Javascript files that you precompress. Browser support for Brotli is coming in Firefox 44 and in Chrome, and it provides about 15% savings versus precompressing with gzip/deflate. more …

Filed under: Systems.  Tagged: , , .

Remove ugly black line from under Gnome 3 window title bar

If you found this page, you probably don’t like the black border line that Gnome 3.16 added underneath the window title bar. I just came across it when I upgraded to Fedora 23. The old title bar used to blend seamlessly into the window background, but not anymore. more …

Filed under: Code.  Tagged: , .

Innovation in Lossless Compression: Apple’s LZFSE, Google’s Brotli and Yann Collet’s Zstandard

With Google’s recent open-sourcing of Brotli following on the heels of Apple’s announcement of LZFSE, it’s an exciting time in the lossless compression world, as new compression schemes tuned for specific use cases now appear to offer substantial enough benefits to challenge the venerable ZIP/Deflate as the Internet’s transport compression algorithm of choice.

Of course, Deflate and its most widespread implementation, zlib, aren’t dead yet, not by a long shot. But what these new LZ77 algorithms offer is significant enough performance gains to justify widespread implementation, and adoption by the W3C. And they have the backing of companies such as Google and Apple, which means they’ll ship on tens of millions of devices and browser installs. more …

One-liner to recursively convert flac to mp3

Here’s what I do, it uses FFmpeg, doesn’t require a for loop and should work on any POSIX-compliant system. Take note that it will delete your original files! The idea is to make a copy of your music folder first, and then run this command on the copy.

find -name "*.flac" -exec sh -c 'ffmpeg -i "$1" -acodec libmp3lame -aq 4 "${1%.flac}.mp3" && rm -f "$1"' _ {} \;

And that’s it! more …

Filed under: Code.  Tagged: , , , .

Outernet’s solar-powered content downloader, Lantern

In the age of the Internet of Things, it is interesting to see a non-Internet device that uses Web technologies in a new way. Outernet is a project started earlier this year by the nonprofit Media Development Investment Fund that buys bandwidth on communications satellites to do one-way broadcast of news, education and other critical content worldwide.

Already available to anyone willing to do a little work with off-the-shelf hardware like Raspbery Pi, Outernet now have an integrated, solar-powered receiver called Lantern that doubles as a charger, theoretically enabling offline, anonymous read-only access to Web content anywhere in the world. more …

Filed under: Technology.  Tagged: , , .

Overclocked Android kernel for Optimus V

Now that LG has corrected its source code, I’ve built my overclocked Android kernel for the Virgin Mobile Optimus V, a phone that’s nearly identical to my Sprint Optimus S and that also runs on Sprint’s 3G CDMA network. If your V needs a speed boost or extra driver support, keep reading! more …

Filed under: Code.  Tagged: , , , .

Update: LG addresses bugs in kernel source for Optimus V

Sweet victory! LG took quick action and wrote me yesterday to tell me they’d released an updated version of the source code for the Optimus V that fixes the bugs I identified over the weekend.

So, all is well in this small corner of the open-source world. I’ve downloaded the new source code (labeled “LGVM670(Thunder) Android Froyo/kernel bugs were fixed” on LG’s download site), and verified that the fixes were made and that the new code builds cleanly.

In case you’re interested in the differences between the Optimus S and Optimus V (LS670 and VM670, respectively), here’s a diff of the kernel sources that I’ve made.

Filed under: Code.  Tagged: , , , , .

Bugs in LG kernel source code for Optimus V

I’ve discovered some bugs in the Linux kernel source code released by LG for the Virgin Mobile Optimus V, or VM670, a close CDMA twin to my Sprint Optimus S. It seems clear from the differences between the S and V source releases that LG has attempted to scrub code comments from the V source, but in the process they’ve created at least two syntax errors that break the code and cause it not to build.

They’ve also left out 15 files that are part of the Linux kernel’s netfilter and needed to build the kernel as configured by LG.

Update: LG has fixed the bugs, so keep reading only if you’re interested in the details.

I’ll detail the problems and explain how to (possibly) fix them below. However, the real issue is that the LG archive is broken as-is, so there’s no way it was used to build the actual Optimus V kernel. While I’m no GPL expert, it seems to me that LG is obligated to provide actual, working source code upon request, not an incomplete, broken fork. Let’s hope this was just an oversight, and one that LG will rectify. more …

Filed under: Code.  Tagged: , , , , .

Firefox 4 for PowerPC Macs: TenFourFox

Mozilla hit me with a double whammy of “your hardware sucks” last week, when they released major new versions of Firefox 4 and mobile Firefox 4 for Android (the first!) … but left me out of both parties.

My Android phone, the LG Optimus S, is only a few months old, but its ARMv6 processor isn’t supported. There’s a faint glimmer of hope there, but with the ARMv6 test builds already pulled, I’m not holding my breath. In the meantime, the stock Android browser and Opera Mobile are both great (Opera’s font rendering needs work in the hinting/character spacing department, but that’s it).

Meanwhile, my Powerbook G4 is still running happily along on OS X 10.4 Tiger, so I was happy to find the answer to my Firefox 4 woes in TenFourFox, a Firefox fork with builds optimized for various G5, G4 and G3 processors. Here’s a mini-review of my impressions after a week, and a look at what’s coming up in browser-land for those of us clinging proudly to the last generation of PowerPC Macintosh computers. more …

Filed under: Reviews.  Tagged: , , .

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